James Mill on Periodical Literature

James Mill (1777-1836), perhaps now best known as the father of John Stuart Mill, was a Scottish radical and a follower and populariser of the thought of Jeremy Bentham.1 In 1823, Bentham's disciples established the Westminster Review, a quarterly periodical, to spread the ideas of philosophic radicalism. Mill contributed an article titled 'Periodical Literature' to … Continue reading James Mill on Periodical Literature

How Sir Martin Gilbert Fudged the Facts to Protect his Hero

I. Sir Martin Gilbert was Churchill’s official biographer, and evidently enamoured of his subject: ‘I never felt that he [Churchill] was going to spring an unpleasant surprise on me. I might find that he was adopting views with which I disagreed. But I always knew that there would be nothing to cause me to think: … Continue reading How Sir Martin Gilbert Fudged the Facts to Protect his Hero

A Regius Professor at Oxford Considers African History

Hugh Trevor-Roper was Regius Professor of History at Oxford 1957-1980, and Master of Peterhouse, Cambridge 1980-1987. In a 1965 book, The Rise of Christian Europe, Trevor-Roper observed that ‘[u]ndergraduates, seduced, as always, by the changing breath of journalistic fashion’ wanted to be ‘taught the history of Africa’. Of course, those foolish, trendy undergraduates had made … Continue reading A Regius Professor at Oxford Considers African History

Britain’s Contribution to the Defeat of Nazi Germany

The first in a series responding to Andrew Roberts' and Zewditu Gebreyohanes' paper, ‘The Racial Consequences of Mr Churchill: A Review' Roberts and Gebreyohanes make several claims about the British contribution during the Second World War in their paper. They write that Britain ‘played a central role’ in the defeat of the Nazis (p21), that … Continue reading Britain’s Contribution to the Defeat of Nazi Germany